By Ben Hollom

How do you use Twitter for your business?

In a relatively short period of time, Twitter turned from a niche microblog to a huge and influential social network. This transformation has brought many brands to the platform in the hope of reaching a wider audience. And while many are successfully leveraging the power of Twitter, nearly as many are failing to make the right impression because of a number of serious mistakes they make.

Business 2 Community has compiled an interesting list of the worst practices to avoid on Twitter, which can lead to your brand trending – for all the wrong reasons.

One of the most common mistakes businesses make is to deliver direct product promotion. While Twitter can indeed push sales up, users are there for social engagement and dialogue; tweets should be all about encouraging users to connect.

A move that would certainly do nothing for a brand is begging for followers. It is true that the more followers, the wider the reach of messages – but this is just not the way to do it. Followers should be won through incentives and engaging content, not through pleas.

Another thing for brands to keep in mind is that they don´t always need to use all of the 140 characters provided. Shorter, sharper tweets are far more engaging and powerful, and also give followers the chance to retweet and include an @mention.

This is where another mistake appears. Brands sometimes forget to respond to @mentions or simply ignore them. Business connections are critical and should be nurtured, so it is advisable that @connects are checked throughout the day, so that followers will not get the impression they are being neglected.

It seems that regularly-updated, engaging content is the way to connect with users on Twitter – and that´s where M2 Bespoke can help. We generate tailored, online content that can be used for a variety of channels, including your news feed and social media activity. We can even provide Twitter headlines if you need us to! Give us a call today to find out more about our content services.

Ben Hollom

July 17, 2013